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From s...@apache.org
Subject svn commit: r161774 - perl/modperl/docs/trunk/src/docs/tutorials/client/compression/compression.pod
Date Mon, 18 Apr 2005 17:10:14 GMT
Author: stas
Date: Mon Apr 18 10:10:13 2005
New Revision: 161774

URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewcvs?view=rev&rev=161774
Log:
updates from Slava

Modified:
    perl/modperl/docs/trunk/src/docs/tutorials/client/compression/compression.pod

Modified: perl/modperl/docs/trunk/src/docs/tutorials/client/compression/compression.pod
URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewcvs/perl/modperl/docs/trunk/src/docs/tutorials/client/compression/compression.pod?view=diff&r1=161773&r2=161774
==============================================================================
--- perl/modperl/docs/trunk/src/docs/tutorials/client/compression/compression.pod (original)
+++ perl/modperl/docs/trunk/src/docs/tutorials/client/compression/compression.pod Mon Apr
18 10:10:13 2005
@@ -65,9 +65,9 @@
 This handler serves the C<fixup> phase of the request-processing flow.
 It is compatible with all known compression handlers and is available from CPAN.
 
-=head1 Q: Why it is important to compress Web content?
+=head1 Why it is important to compress Web content?
 
-=head2 A: Reduced equipment costs and the competitive advantage of dramatically faster page
loads.
+=head2 Reduced equipment costs and the competitive advantage of dramatically faster page
loads.
 
 Web content compression noticeably increases delivery speed to clients
 and may allow providers to serve higher content volumes without increasing hardware expenditures.
@@ -75,9 +75,9 @@
 
 Industry leaders like I<Yahoo> and I<Google> are widely using content compression
in their businesses.
 
-=head1 Q: How much improvement can I expect?
+=head1 How much improvement can I expect?
 
-=head2 A: Effective compression can achieve increases in transmission efficiency from 3 to
20 times.
+=head2 Effective compression can achieve increases in transmission efficiency from 3 to 20
times.
 
 The compression ratio is highly content-dependent.
 For example, if the compression algorithm is able to detect repeated patterns of characters,
@@ -99,18 +99,18 @@
 =for html
 </blockquote>
 
-=head1 Q: How hard is it to implement content compression on an existing site?
+=head1 How hard is it to implement content compression on an existing site?
 
-=head2 A: Implementing content compression on an existing site typically involves no more
than installing and configuring an appropriate Apache handler on the Web server.
+=head2 Implementing content compression on an existing site typically involves no more than
installing and configuring an appropriate Apache handler on the Web server.
 
 This approach works in most of the cases I have seen.
 In some special cases you will need to take extra care with respect to the global architecture
of your Web application,
 but such cases may generally be readily addressed through various techniques.
 To date I have found no fundamental barriers to practical implementation of Web content compression.
 
-=head1 Q: Does compression work with standard Web browsers?
+=head1 Does compression work with standard Web browsers?
 
-=head2 A: Yes. No client side changes or settings are required.
+=head2 Yes. No client side changes or settings are required.
 
 All modern browser makers claim to be able to handle compressed content and are able to decompress
it on the fly,
 transparent to the user.
@@ -120,18 +120,18 @@
 I strongly recommend use of the C<Apache::CompressClientFixup> handler in your server
configuration
 in order to prevent compression for known buggy clients.
 
-=head1 Q: Is it possible to combine the content compression with data encryption?
+=head1 Is it possible to combine the content compression with data encryption?
 
-=head2 A: Yes.  Compressed content can be encrypted and securely transmitted over SSL.
+=head2 Yes.  Compressed content can be encrypted and securely transmitted over SSL.
 
 On the client side, the browser transparently unencrypts and uncompresses the content for
the user.
 It is important to maintain the correct order of operations on server side to keep the transaction
secure.
 You must compress the content first and then apply an encryption mechanism.
 This is the only order of operations current browsers support.
 
-=head1 Q: What software is required on the server side for content compression?
+=head1 What software is required on the server side for content compression?
 
-=head2 A: There are four known mod_perl modules/packages for Web content compression available
to date for Apache 1.3 (in alphabetical order):
+=head2 There are four known mod_perl modules/packages for Web content compression available
to date for Apache 1.3 (in alphabetical order):
 
 =over 4
 
@@ -192,9 +192,9 @@
 
 =back
 
-=head1 Q: What is the typical overhead in terms of CPU use for the content compression?
+=head1 What is the typical overhead in terms of CPU use for the content compression?
 
-=head2 A: Typical CPU overhead that originates from content compression is insignificant.
+=head2 Typical CPU overhead that originates from content compression is insignificant.
 
 In my observations of data compression of files of up to 200K it takes less then 60 ms CPU
on a P4 3 GHz processor.
 I could not measure the lower boundary reliably for dynamic compression, because there are
no really measurable latency.
@@ -209,9 +209,9 @@
 If the ISP buffers its traffic, however, the content provider might not feel a dramatic impact
-- apart of the fact
 that they are paying their telecom providers for the transmission of considerable unnecessary
data. 
 
-=head1 Q: Is it possible to compress the output from C<Apache::Registry> with C<Apache::Dynagzip>?
+=head1 Is it possible to compress the output from C<Apache::Registry> with C<Apache::Dynagzip>?
 
-=head2 A: Yes.  This should be fairly easy to accomplish, as follows:
+=head2 Yes.  This should be fairly easy to accomplish, as follows:
 
 If your page/application is initially configured like this:
 
@@ -280,9 +280,9 @@
 with no C<Apache::Dynagzip> involved.
 See C<Apache::Filter> documentation if you have any problems.
 
-=head1 Q: Is it possible to compress output from a Mason-driven application with C<Apache::Dynagzip>?
+=head1 Is it possible to compress output from a Mason-driven application with C<Apache::Dynagzip>?
 
-=head2 A: Yes. C<HTML::Mason::ApacheHandler> is compatible with the C<Apache::Filter>
chain.
+=head2 Yes. C<HTML::Mason::ApacheHandler> is compatible with the C<Apache::Filter>
chain.
 
 If your application is initially configured like:
 
@@ -334,15 +334,15 @@
 
 This basic configuration uses many defaults.  See C<Apache::Dynagzip> POD for further
fine tuning.
 
-=head1 Q: Is commercial support available for C<Apache::Dynagzip>?
+=head1 Is commercial support available for C<Apache::Dynagzip>?
 
-=head2 A: Yes.  I<Slav Company, Ltd.> provides commercial support for C<Apache::Dynagzip>
worldwide.
+=head2 Yes.  I<Slav Company, Ltd.> provides commercial support for C<Apache::Dynagzip>
worldwide.
 
 Since the author of C<Apache::Dynagzip> is employed by Slav Company, service is effective
and consistent.
 
-=head1 Q: Why is it important to maintain a control over the chunk size?
+=head1 Why is it important to maintain a control over the chunk size?
 
-=head2 A: It helps to reduce response latency.
+=head2 It helps to reduce response latency.
 
 C<Apache::Dynagzip> is the only handler to date that begins transmission of compressed
data as soon
 as the initial uncompressed pieces of data arrive from their source, at a time when the source
process
@@ -354,9 +354,9 @@
 I would also mention that the internal buffer in C<Apache::Dynagzip> always prevents
Apache
 from the creating too short chunks over HTTP/1.1, or from transmitting too short pieces of
data over HTTP/1.0.
 
-=head1 Q: Is it worthwhile to strip leading blank spaces prior to gzip compression?
+=head1 Is it worthwhile to strip leading blank spaces prior to gzip compression?
 
-=head2 A: Yes.  It is usually worthwhile to do this.
+=head2 Yes.  It is usually worthwhile to do this.
 
 The benefits of blank space stripping are mostly significant for non-gzipped data transmissions.
 One can expect some 5-20% reduction in stream size on regular 'structured' HTML, JavaScript,
CSS, XML, etc.,
@@ -374,9 +374,9 @@
 
 =back
 
-=head1 Q: Are there any content compression solutions for vanilla Apache 1.3?
+=head1 Are there any content compression solutions for vanilla Apache 1.3?
 
-=head2 A: Yes.  There are two compression modules written in C that are available for vanilla
Apache 1.3:
+=head2 Yes.  There are two compression modules written in C that are available for vanilla
Apache 1.3:
 
 =over 4
 
@@ -392,9 +392,9 @@
 
 See their respective documentation for further details.
 
-=head1 Q: Can I compress the output of my site at the application level?
+=head1 Can I compress the output of my site at the application level?
 
-=head2 A: Yes, if your Web server is CGI/1.1 compatible and allows you to create specific
HTTP headers from your application, or when you use an application framework that carries
its own handler capable of compressing outbound data.
+=head2 Yes, if your Web server is CGI/1.1 compatible and allows you to create specific HTTP
headers from your application, or when you use an application framework that carries its own
handler capable of compressing outbound data.
 
 For example, vanilla Apache 1.3 is CGI/1.1 compatible.
 It allows development of CGI scripts/programs that can generate compressed outgoing streams
@@ -409,9 +409,9 @@
 
 See the documentation for the particular packages for details.
 
-=head1 Q: Are there any content compression solutions for Apache-2?
+=head1 Are there any content compression solutions for Apache-2?
 
-=head2 A: Yes.  A core compression module written in C, C<mod_deflate>, is available
for Apache-2.
+=head2 Yes.  A core compression module written in C, C<mod_deflate>, is available for
Apache-2.
 
 C<mod_deflate> for Apache-2 was written by Ian Holsman (USA).
 
@@ -429,9 +429,9 @@
 
 =back
 
-=head1 Q: When is C<Apache::Dynagzip> supposed to be ported to Apache-2?
+=head1 When is C<Apache::Dynagzip> supposed to be ported to Apache-2?
 
-=head2 A: There are no current plans to port C<Apache::Dynagzip> to Apache-2:
+=head2 There are no current plans to port C<Apache::Dynagzip> to Apache-2:
 
 C<mod_deflate> for Apache-2 is capable of providing all basic functionality required
for effective
 dynamic content compression.
@@ -439,16 +439,16 @@
 For instance, C<Apache::Clean>, which is already ported to Apache-2, can be used
 to strip unnecessary blank spaces from outbound streams.
 
-=head1 Q: Where can I read the original descriptions of the C<gzip> and C<deflate>
formats?
+=head1 Where can I read the original descriptions of the C<gzip> and C<deflate>
formats?
 
-=head2 A: C<gzip> format is published as rfc1952, and C<deflate> format is published
as rfc1951.
+=head2 C<gzip> format is published as rfc1952, and C<deflate> format is published
as rfc1951.
 
 You can find many mirrors of RFC archives on the Internet.
 Try, for instance, my favorite at L<http://www.ietf.org/rfc.html>
 
-=head1 Q: Are there any known compression problems with specific browsers?
+=head1 Are there any known compression problems with specific browsers?
 
-=head2 A: Yes.  Netscape 4 has problems with compressed cascading style sheets and JavaScript
files.
+=head2 Yes.  Netscape 4 has problems with compressed cascading style sheets and JavaScript
files.
 
 You can use C<Apache::CompressClientFixup> to disable compression for these files dynamically
on Apache-1.3.
 C<Apache::Dynagzip> is capable of providing so-called C<light compression> for
these files.
@@ -456,9 +456,9 @@
 On Apache-2, C<mod_deflate> can be configured to disable compression for these files
dynamically,
 and the C<Apache::Clean> filter can be used to strip unnecessary blank spaces.
 
-=head1 Q: Where can I find more information about the compression features of modern browsers?
+=head1 Where can I find more information about the compression features of modern browsers?
 
-=head2 A: Michael Schroepl maintains a highly valuable site
+=head2 Michael Schroepl maintains a highly valuable site
 
 See it at L<http://www.schroepl.net/projekte/mod_gzip/browser.htm>
 



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