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From s...@apache.org
Subject cvs commit: modperl-docs/src/docs/2.0/user/handlers protocols.pod
Date Thu, 08 Apr 2004 00:21:59 GMT
stas        2004/04/07 17:21:59

  Modified:    src/docs/2.0/user/handlers protocols.pod
  Log:
  document the need to set the socket to a blocking IO mode in the protocol handlers
  that operate on the socket
  
  Revision  Changes    Path
  1.15      +14 -4     modperl-docs/src/docs/2.0/user/handlers/protocols.pod
  
  Index: protocols.pod
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvs/modperl-docs/src/docs/2.0/user/handlers/protocols.pod,v
  retrieving revision 1.14
  retrieving revision 1.15
  diff -u -u -r1.14 -r1.15
  --- protocols.pod	23 Feb 2004 23:54:35 -0000	1.14
  +++ protocols.pod	8 Apr 2004 00:21:59 -0000	1.15
  @@ -166,11 +166,16 @@
     sub handler {
         my ($c) = @_;
         my $socket = $c->client_socket;
  +      $socket->opt_set(APR::SO_NONBLOCK, 0);
         # ...
         return Apache::OK;
     }
   
  -
  +Most likely you'll need to set the socket to perform blocking IO. On
  +some platforms (e.g. Linux) Apache gives us a socket which is set for
  +blocking, on other platforms (.e.g. Solaris) it doesn't. Unless you
  +know which platforms your application will be running on, always
  +explicitly set it to the blocking mode as in the example above.
   
   Now let's look at the following two examples of connection
   handlers. The first using the connection socket to read and write the
  @@ -228,12 +233,14 @@
     use APR::Socket ();
     
     use Apache::Const -compile => 'OK';
  +  use APR::Const    -compile => 'SO_NONBLOCK';
     
     use constant BUFF_LEN => 1024;
     
     sub handler {
         my $c = shift;
         my $socket = $c->client_socket;
  +      $socket->opt_set(APR::SO_NONBLOCK, 0);
     
         my $buff;
         while (1) {
  @@ -258,8 +265,10 @@
   protocol handler, the first argument is not a C<request_rec>, but a
   C<conn_rec> blessed into the C<Apache::Connection> class.  We have
   direct access to the client socket via C<Apache::Connection>'s
  -I<client_socket> method.  This returns an object blessed into the
  -C<APR::Socket> class.
  +I<client_socket> method.  This returns an object, blessed into the
  +C<APR::Socket> class. Before using the socket, we make sure that it's
  +set to perform blocking IO, by using the C<APR::SO_NONBLOCK> constant,
  +compiled earlier.
   
   Inside the read/send loop, the handler attempts to read C<BUFF_LEN>
   bytes from the client socket into the C<$buff> buffer.  The C<$rlen>
  @@ -344,7 +353,8 @@
         my $last = 0;
     
         while (1) {
  -          my $rv = $c->input_filters->get_brigade($bb_in, Apache::MODE_GETLINE);
  +          my $rv = $c->input_filters->get_brigade($bb_in,
  +                                                  Apache::MODE_GETLINE);
             if ($rv != APR::SUCCESS && $rv != APR::EOF) {
                 my $error = APR::strerror($rv);
                 warn __PACKAGE__ . ": get_brigade: $error\n";
  
  
  

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