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From xav...@apache.org
Subject svn commit: r536488 [2/19] - in /incubator/ivy/core/trunk: ./ doc/ doc/doc/ doc/doc/configuration/ doc/doc/configuration/macrodef/ doc/doc/configuration/namespace/ doc/doc/ivyfile/ doc/doc/releasenotes/ doc/doc/resolver/ doc/doc/tutorial/ doc/doc/tutor...
Date Wed, 09 May 2007 10:58:16 GMT
Modified: incubator/ivy/core/trunk/doc/doc/bestpractices.html
URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewvc/incubator/ivy/core/trunk/doc/doc/bestpractices.html?view=diff&rev=536488&r1=536487&r2=536488
==============================================================================
--- incubator/ivy/core/trunk/doc/doc/bestpractices.html (original)
+++ incubator/ivy/core/trunk/doc/doc/bestpractices.html Wed May  9 03:58:10 2007
@@ -1,106 +1,106 @@
-<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">
-<!--
-   Licensed to the Apache Software Foundation (ASF) under one
-   or more contributor license agreements.  See the NOTICE file
-   distributed with this work for additional information
-   regarding copyright ownership.  The ASF licenses this file
-   to you under the Apache License, Version 2.0 (the
-   "License"); you may not use this file except in compliance
-   with the License.  You may obtain a copy of the License at
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-
-   Unless required by applicable law or agreed to in writing,
-   software distributed under the License is distributed on an
-   "AS IS" BASIS, WITHOUT WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY
-   KIND, either express or implied.  See the License for the
-   specific language governing permissions and limitations
-   under the License.    
--->
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-<head>
-	<META HTTP-EQUIV="Content-Type" CONTENT="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1">
-	<script type="text/javascript">var xookiConfig = {level: 1};</script>	
-	<script type="text/javascript" src="../xooki/xooki.js"></script>
-</head>
-<body>
-	<textarea id="xooki-source">
-Here are some recommendations and best practices we have gathered throughout our experience and consultancies with our customers.
-
-<h1>Add module descriptors for all your modules</h1>
-In Ivy world, module descriptors are ivy files, which are basically simple xml files describing both what the module produce as artifact and its dependencies.
-
-It is a good practice to write or download module descriptors for all the modules involved in your development, even for your third party dependencies, and even if they don't provide themselves such module descriptors.
-
-First it will seem like an extra work, and require time. But when you will have several modules using the same third party library, and than you will only need to add one line to your ivy file to get this library and all its own dependencies that you really need (if you have good module descriptors in your repository, especially with the use of module <a href="../doc/concept#configurations.html">configurations</a>). It will also be very helpful when you want to upgrade a dependency. One single change in your module ivy file and you will get the updated version with its updated (or not) dependencies.
-
-Therefore we recommend to add ivy files for all the modules in your repository, you can even enforce this rule by setting the allownomd attribute to false on your <a href="../doc/configuration/resolvers.html">resolvers</a>. Hence you shouldn't need to use the dependency artifact inclusion/exclusion/specification feature of Ivy, which should only be used in very specific cases.
-
-<h1>Use your own enterprise repository</h1>
-This is usually not a valid recommendation for open source projects, but for the enterprise world we strongly suggest to avoid relying on a public repository like maven ibiblio or ivyrep. Why? Well, there are a couple of reasons:
-<ul>
-<li>control</li> The main problem with this kind of public repositories is that you don't have control over the repository. This means that if a module descriptor is broken you cannot easily fixed it. Sure you can use a chain between a shared repository and the public one and put your fixed module descriptor in the shared repository so that it hide the one on the public repository, but this makes repository browsing and maintenance cumbersome. 
-Even more problematic is the possible updates of the repository. We know that versions published in such repositories should be stable and not be updated, but we also frequently see that a module descriptor is buggy, or an artifact corrupted. We even see sometimes a new version published with the same name as the preceding one because the previous one was simply badly packaged. This can occur even to the best, it occured to us with Ivy 1.2 :-) But then we decided to publish the new version with a different name, 1.2a. But if the repository manager allow such updates, this means that what worked before can break. It can thus break your build reproducibility.
-<li>reliability</li> Ibiblio maven repository is not particularly well known for its reliability (we often experience major slow down or even complete break of the site), and ivyrep is only supported by a small company (yes we are only a small company!). So slow down and site hang occurs also. And if the repository you rely on is down, this can cause major slow down in your development or release process.
-<li>accuracy</li> a public repository usually contains much more than what you actually need (except maybe ivyrep which certainly features much less than what you need :-)). Is it a problem? We think so. We think that in an enterprise environment the libraries you use should step through some kind of validation process before being used in every projects of your company. And what better way to do so? Setup an enterprise repository with only the libraries you actually want to use. This will not only ensure a better quality of your application dependencies, but help to have the same versions everywhere, and even help when declaring your module dependencies, if you use a tool like IvyDE, the code completion will only show relevant information about your repository, with only the libraries you actually want to see.
-</ul>
-Note that it's not because you use an enterprise repository that you have to build it entirely by hand. Ivy features an [[ant:install]] task which can be used to install modules from a repository to another one, so it can be used to selectively install modules from a public repository to your enterprise repository, where you will then be able to ensure control, reliability and accuracy.
-
-<h1>Always use patterns with at least organisation and module</h1>
-Ivy is very flexible and can accomodate a lot of existing repositories, using the concept of <a href="../doc/concept#pattern.html">patterns</a>. But if your repository doesn't exist yet, we strongly recommend to always use the organisation and the module name in your pattern, even for private repository where you put only your own modules (which all the same organisation). Why? Because Ivy listing feature rely on the token it can find in the pattern. If you have no organisation token in your pattern, Ivy won't be able to list the (only?) organisation in your repository. And this can be a problem for code completion in IvyDE, for example, but also for repository wide tasks like [[ant:install]] or [[ant:repreport]].
-
-<h1>Public ivysettings.xml with public repositories</h1>
-If you create a public repository, provide an url to corresponding <a href="../doc/configuration.html">ivysettings.xml</a>. It's pretty easy to do, and if someone want to leverage your repository, he will just have to call [[ant:configure]] with the url of your ivysettings.xml, or <a href="../doc/configuration/include.html">include</a> it in its own configuration file, which makes it really easy to combine several public repositories.
-
-<h1>Dealing with integration versions</h1>
-Very often especially when working in a team or with several modules, you will need to rely on intermediate, non finalized versions of your modules. These versions are what we call integration versions, because their main objective is to be integrated with other modules to make and test an application or a framework. 
-
-If you follow the continuous integration paradigm across modules, these integration versions can be produced by a continuous integration server, very frequently.
-
-So, how can you deal with these, possibly numerous, integration versions?
-
-There are basically two ways to deal with them, both ways being supported by Ivy:
-<ul>
-<li>use a naming convention like a special suffix</li> the idea is pretty simple, each time you publish a new integration of your module you give the same name to the version (in maven world this is for example 1.0-SNAPSHOT). The dependency manager should then be aware that this version is special because it changes over time, so that it does not trust its local cache if it already has the version, but check the date of the version on the repository and see if it hass changed. In Ivy this is supported using the <a href="../doc/ivyfile/dependency.html">changing attribute</a> on a dependency or by configuring the <a href="../doc/configuration/resolvers.html">changing pattern</a> to use for all your modules.
-<li>create automatically a new version for each</li> in this case you use either a build number or a timestamp to publish each new integration version with a new version name. Then you can use one of the numerous ways in Ivy to <a href="../doc/ivyfile/dependency.html">express a version constraint</a>. Usually selecting the very latest one (using 'latest.integration' as version constraint) is enough.
-</ul>
-
-So, which way is the best? As often, it depends on your context, and if one of the two was really bad it wouldn't be supported in Ivy :-)
-
-But usually we recommend to use the second one, because using a new version each time you publish a new version better fits the version identity paradigm, and can make <b>all</b> your builds reproducible, even integration one. And this is interesting because it enables, with some work in your build system, to introduce a mechanism to promote an integration build to a more stable status, like a milestone or a release. 
-
-Imagine you have a customer which comes on a monday morning and asks your latest version of your software, for testing or demonstration purpose. Obviously he needs it for the afternoon :-) Now if you have a continuous integration process and a good tracking of your changes and your artifacts, it may occur that you are actually able to fulfill his request without needing the use of a dolorean to give you some more time :-) But it may occur also that your latest version stable enough to be used for the purpose of the customer was actually built a few days ago, because the very latest just break a feature or introduce a new one you don't want to deliver. In this case, you can deliver this 'stable' integration build if you want, but be sure that a few days, or weeks, or even months later, the customer will ask for a bug fix on this demo only version. Why? Because it's a customer, and we all know how they are :-)
-
-So, with a build promotion feature of any build in your repository, the solution would be pretty easy: when the customer ask for the version, you not only deliver the integration build, but you also promote it to a milestone status, for example. this promotion indicates that you should keep track of this version in a long period, to be able to come back to it and create a branch if needed.
-
-Unfortunately Ivy does not by its own allow to have such reproducible builds out of the box, simply because Ivy is a dependency manager, not a build tool. But if you publish only versions with a distinct name and use Ivy features like versions constraint replacement during the publication or recursive delivery of modules, it can really help.
-
-On the other hand, the main drawback of this solution is that it can produce a lot of intermediate versions, and  you will have to run some cleaning scripts in your repository unless your company name starts with a G and ends with oogle :-)
-
-<h1>Inlining dependencies or not?</h1>
-With Ivy 1.4 you can resolve a dependency without even writing an ivy file. This pratice is called inlining. But what is it good for, and when should it be avoided?
-
-Putting ivy dependencies in a separate file has the following advantages:
-<ul>
-<li>separate revision cycle</li> if your dependencies may change more often than your build, it's a good idea to separate the two, to isolate the two concepts: describing how to build / describing your project dependencies
-<li>possibility to publish</li> if you describe dependencies of a module which can itself be reused, you will ant to publish it to a repository. In this case the publication is only possible if you have a separate ivy file
-<li>more flexible</li> inline dependencies can only be used to express one dependency and only one. An ivy file can be used to express much more complex dependencies
-</ul>
-On the other hand, using inline dependencies is very useful when:
-<ul>
-<li>you want to use a custom task in your ant build</li> Without ivy you usually either copy the custom task jar in ant lib, which requires maintenance of your workstation installation, or use a manual copy or download and a taskdef with the appropriate classpath, which is better. But if you have several custom tasks, or if they have themselves dependencies, it can become cumbersome. Using Ivy with an inline dependency is an elegant way to solve this problem.
-<li>you want to easily deploy an application</li> If you already build your application and its modules using Ivy, it is really easy to leverage your ivy repository to download your application and all its dependencies on the local filesystem, ready to be executed. If you also put your configuration files as artifacts in your repository (maybee packaged as a zip), the whole installation process can rely on ivy, easing the automatic installation of <b>any</b> version of your application available in your repository!
-</ul>
-<h1>Hire an expert</h1>
-Build and dependency management is often considered with a too low level priority in the software development world. We often see build management implemented by developers when they have time. Even if this may seem like a time and money saving in the short term, it often turns out to be a very bad choice in the long term. Building software is not a simple task, when you want to ensure automatic, tested, fully reproducible builds, releases and installations. On the other hand, once a good build system fitting your very specific needs is setup, it can then only rely on a few people with a good understanding of what is going on, with a constant quality ensured. 
-
-Therefore hiring a build and dependency expert to analyse and improve your build and release system is most of the time a very good choice.
-
-<h1>Feedback</h1>
-These best practices are the reflect of our own experience, but we do not pretend to own the unique truth about dependency management or even Ivy use.
-
-So feel free to comment on this page to add your own experience feedback, suggestions or opinion.
-	</textarea>
-<script type="text/javascript">xooki.postProcess();</script>
-</body>
-</html>
+<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">
+<!--
+   Licensed to the Apache Software Foundation (ASF) under one
+   or more contributor license agreements.  See the NOTICE file
+   distributed with this work for additional information
+   regarding copyright ownership.  The ASF licenses this file
+   to you under the Apache License, Version 2.0 (the
+   "License"); you may not use this file except in compliance
+   with the License.  You may obtain a copy of the License at
+
+     http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0
+
+   Unless required by applicable law or agreed to in writing,
+   software distributed under the License is distributed on an
+   "AS IS" BASIS, WITHOUT WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY
+   KIND, either express or implied.  See the License for the
+   specific language governing permissions and limitations
+   under the License.    
+-->
+<html>
+<head>
+	<META HTTP-EQUIV="Content-Type" CONTENT="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1">
+	<script type="text/javascript">var xookiConfig = {level: 1};</script>	
+	<script type="text/javascript" src="../xooki/xooki.js"></script>
+</head>
+<body>
+	<textarea id="xooki-source">
+Here are some recommendations and best practices we have gathered throughout our experience and consultancies with our customers.
+
+<h1>Add module descriptors for all your modules</h1>
+In Ivy world, module descriptors are ivy files, which are basically simple xml files describing both what the module produce as artifact and its dependencies.
+
+It is a good practice to write or download module descriptors for all the modules involved in your development, even for your third party dependencies, and even if they don't provide themselves such module descriptors.
+
+First it will seem like an extra work, and require time. But when you will have several modules using the same third party library, and than you will only need to add one line to your ivy file to get this library and all its own dependencies that you really need (if you have good module descriptors in your repository, especially with the use of module <a href="../doc/concept#configurations.html">configurations</a>). It will also be very helpful when you want to upgrade a dependency. One single change in your module ivy file and you will get the updated version with its updated (or not) dependencies.
+
+Therefore we recommend to add ivy files for all the modules in your repository, you can even enforce this rule by setting the allownomd attribute to false on your <a href="../doc/configuration/resolvers.html">resolvers</a>. Hence you shouldn't need to use the dependency artifact inclusion/exclusion/specification feature of Ivy, which should only be used in very specific cases.
+
+<h1>Use your own enterprise repository</h1>
+This is usually not a valid recommendation for open source projects, but for the enterprise world we strongly suggest to avoid relying on a public repository like maven ibiblio or ivyrep. Why? Well, there are a couple of reasons:
+<ul>
+<li>control</li> The main problem with this kind of public repositories is that you don't have control over the repository. This means that if a module descriptor is broken you cannot easily fixed it. Sure you can use a chain between a shared repository and the public one and put your fixed module descriptor in the shared repository so that it hide the one on the public repository, but this makes repository browsing and maintenance cumbersome. 
+Even more problematic is the possible updates of the repository. We know that versions published in such repositories should be stable and not be updated, but we also frequently see that a module descriptor is buggy, or an artifact corrupted. We even see sometimes a new version published with the same name as the preceding one because the previous one was simply badly packaged. This can occur even to the best, it occured to us with Ivy 1.2 :-) But then we decided to publish the new version with a different name, 1.2a. But if the repository manager allow such updates, this means that what worked before can break. It can thus break your build reproducibility.
+<li>reliability</li> Ibiblio maven repository is not particularly well known for its reliability (we often experience major slow down or even complete break of the site), and ivyrep is only supported by a small company (yes we are only a small company!). So slow down and site hang occurs also. And if the repository you rely on is down, this can cause major slow down in your development or release process.
+<li>accuracy</li> a public repository usually contains much more than what you actually need (except maybe ivyrep which certainly features much less than what you need :-)). Is it a problem? We think so. We think that in an enterprise environment the libraries you use should step through some kind of validation process before being used in every projects of your company. And what better way to do so? Setup an enterprise repository with only the libraries you actually want to use. This will not only ensure a better quality of your application dependencies, but help to have the same versions everywhere, and even help when declaring your module dependencies, if you use a tool like IvyDE, the code completion will only show relevant information about your repository, with only the libraries you actually want to see.
+</ul>
+Note that it's not because you use an enterprise repository that you have to build it entirely by hand. Ivy features an [[ant:install]] task which can be used to install modules from a repository to another one, so it can be used to selectively install modules from a public repository to your enterprise repository, where you will then be able to ensure control, reliability and accuracy.
+
+<h1>Always use patterns with at least organisation and module</h1>
+Ivy is very flexible and can accomodate a lot of existing repositories, using the concept of <a href="../doc/concept#pattern.html">patterns</a>. But if your repository doesn't exist yet, we strongly recommend to always use the organisation and the module name in your pattern, even for private repository where you put only your own modules (which all the same organisation). Why? Because Ivy listing feature rely on the token it can find in the pattern. If you have no organisation token in your pattern, Ivy won't be able to list the (only?) organisation in your repository. And this can be a problem for code completion in IvyDE, for example, but also for repository wide tasks like [[ant:install]] or [[ant:repreport]].
+
+<h1>Public ivysettings.xml with public repositories</h1>
+If you create a public repository, provide an url to corresponding <a href="../doc/configuration.html">ivysettings.xml</a>. It's pretty easy to do, and if someone want to leverage your repository, he will just have to call [[ant:configure]] with the url of your ivysettings.xml, or <a href="../doc/configuration/include.html">include</a> it in its own configuration file, which makes it really easy to combine several public repositories.
+
+<h1>Dealing with integration versions</h1>
+Very often especially when working in a team or with several modules, you will need to rely on intermediate, non finalized versions of your modules. These versions are what we call integration versions, because their main objective is to be integrated with other modules to make and test an application or a framework. 
+
+If you follow the continuous integration paradigm across modules, these integration versions can be produced by a continuous integration server, very frequently.
+
+So, how can you deal with these, possibly numerous, integration versions?
+
+There are basically two ways to deal with them, both ways being supported by Ivy:
+<ul>
+<li>use a naming convention like a special suffix</li> the idea is pretty simple, each time you publish a new integration of your module you give the same name to the version (in maven world this is for example 1.0-SNAPSHOT). The dependency manager should then be aware that this version is special because it changes over time, so that it does not trust its local cache if it already has the version, but check the date of the version on the repository and see if it hass changed. In Ivy this is supported using the <a href="../doc/ivyfile/dependency.html">changing attribute</a> on a dependency or by configuring the <a href="../doc/configuration/resolvers.html">changing pattern</a> to use for all your modules.
+<li>create automatically a new version for each</li> in this case you use either a build number or a timestamp to publish each new integration version with a new version name. Then you can use one of the numerous ways in Ivy to <a href="../doc/ivyfile/dependency.html">express a version constraint</a>. Usually selecting the very latest one (using 'latest.integration' as version constraint) is enough.
+</ul>
+
+So, which way is the best? As often, it depends on your context, and if one of the two was really bad it wouldn't be supported in Ivy :-)
+
+But usually we recommend to use the second one, because using a new version each time you publish a new version better fits the version identity paradigm, and can make <b>all</b> your builds reproducible, even integration one. And this is interesting because it enables, with some work in your build system, to introduce a mechanism to promote an integration build to a more stable status, like a milestone or a release. 
+
+Imagine you have a customer which comes on a monday morning and asks your latest version of your software, for testing or demonstration purpose. Obviously he needs it for the afternoon :-) Now if you have a continuous integration process and a good tracking of your changes and your artifacts, it may occur that you are actually able to fulfill his request without needing the use of a dolorean to give you some more time :-) But it may occur also that your latest version stable enough to be used for the purpose of the customer was actually built a few days ago, because the very latest just break a feature or introduce a new one you don't want to deliver. In this case, you can deliver this 'stable' integration build if you want, but be sure that a few days, or weeks, or even months later, the customer will ask for a bug fix on this demo only version. Why? Because it's a customer, and we all know how they are :-)
+
+So, with a build promotion feature of any build in your repository, the solution would be pretty easy: when the customer ask for the version, you not only deliver the integration build, but you also promote it to a milestone status, for example. this promotion indicates that you should keep track of this version in a long period, to be able to come back to it and create a branch if needed.
+
+Unfortunately Ivy does not by its own allow to have such reproducible builds out of the box, simply because Ivy is a dependency manager, not a build tool. But if you publish only versions with a distinct name and use Ivy features like versions constraint replacement during the publication or recursive delivery of modules, it can really help.
+
+On the other hand, the main drawback of this solution is that it can produce a lot of intermediate versions, and  you will have to run some cleaning scripts in your repository unless your company name starts with a G and ends with oogle :-)
+
+<h1>Inlining dependencies or not?</h1>
+With Ivy 1.4 you can resolve a dependency without even writing an ivy file. This pratice is called inlining. But what is it good for, and when should it be avoided?
+
+Putting ivy dependencies in a separate file has the following advantages:
+<ul>
+<li>separate revision cycle</li> if your dependencies may change more often than your build, it's a good idea to separate the two, to isolate the two concepts: describing how to build / describing your project dependencies
+<li>possibility to publish</li> if you describe dependencies of a module which can itself be reused, you will ant to publish it to a repository. In this case the publication is only possible if you have a separate ivy file
+<li>more flexible</li> inline dependencies can only be used to express one dependency and only one. An ivy file can be used to express much more complex dependencies
+</ul>
+On the other hand, using inline dependencies is very useful when:
+<ul>
+<li>you want to use a custom task in your ant build</li> Without ivy you usually either copy the custom task jar in ant lib, which requires maintenance of your workstation installation, or use a manual copy or download and a taskdef with the appropriate classpath, which is better. But if you have several custom tasks, or if they have themselves dependencies, it can become cumbersome. Using Ivy with an inline dependency is an elegant way to solve this problem.
+<li>you want to easily deploy an application</li> If you already build your application and its modules using Ivy, it is really easy to leverage your ivy repository to download your application and all its dependencies on the local filesystem, ready to be executed. If you also put your configuration files as artifacts in your repository (maybee packaged as a zip), the whole installation process can rely on ivy, easing the automatic installation of <b>any</b> version of your application available in your repository!
+</ul>
+<h1>Hire an expert</h1>
+Build and dependency management is often considered with a too low level priority in the software development world. We often see build management implemented by developers when they have time. Even if this may seem like a time and money saving in the short term, it often turns out to be a very bad choice in the long term. Building software is not a simple task, when you want to ensure automatic, tested, fully reproducible builds, releases and installations. On the other hand, once a good build system fitting your very specific needs is setup, it can then only rely on a few people with a good understanding of what is going on, with a constant quality ensured. 
+
+Therefore hiring a build and dependency expert to analyse and improve your build and release system is most of the time a very good choice.
+
+<h1>Feedback</h1>
+These best practices are the reflect of our own experience, but we do not pretend to own the unique truth about dependency management or even Ivy use.
+
+So feel free to comment on this page to add your own experience feedback, suggestions or opinion.
+	</textarea>
+<script type="text/javascript">xooki.postProcess();</script>
+</body>
+</html>

Propchange: incubator/ivy/core/trunk/doc/doc/bestpractices.html
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    svn:eol-style = LF

Modified: incubator/ivy/core/trunk/doc/doc/concept.html
URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewvc/incubator/ivy/core/trunk/doc/doc/concept.html?view=diff&rev=536488&r1=536487&r2=536488
==============================================================================
--- incubator/ivy/core/trunk/doc/doc/concept.html (original)
+++ incubator/ivy/core/trunk/doc/doc/concept.html Wed May  9 03:58:10 2007
@@ -1,236 +1,236 @@
-<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">
-<!--
-   Licensed to the Apache Software Foundation (ASF) under one
-   or more contributor license agreements.  See the NOTICE file
-   distributed with this work for additional information
-   regarding copyright ownership.  The ASF licenses this file
-   to you under the Apache License, Version 2.0 (the
-   "License"); you may not use this file except in compliance
-   with the License.  You may obtain a copy of the License at
-
-     http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0
-
-   Unless required by applicable law or agreed to in writing,
-   software distributed under the License is distributed on an
-   "AS IS" BASIS, WITHOUT WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY
-   KIND, either express or implied.  See the License for the
-   specific language governing permissions and limitations
-   under the License.    
--->
-<html>
-<head>
-	<META HTTP-EQUIV="Content-Type" CONTENT="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1">
-	<script type="text/javascript">var xookiConfig = {level: 1};</script>	
-	<script type="text/javascript" src="../xooki/xooki.js"></script>
-</head>
-<body>
-	<textarea id="xooki-source">
-<h1>Dependency Resolver</h1>
-A dependency resolver is a pluggable class in ivy which is used to:
-<ul>
-<li>find dependencies ivy files</li>
-<li>download dependencies artifacts</li>
-</ul>
-The notion of artifact "downloading" is large: artifact can be on a web site, or on the local file system of your machine. The download is thus the fact to bring a file from a repository to ivy cache.
-
-Moreover, the fact that it is the responsibility of the resolver to find ivy files and download artifacts help to implement various resolving strategies.
-
-As you see, a dependency resolver can be thought as a class responsible of describing a repository.
-
-If you want to see which resolvers are available in ivy, you can go to the corresponding <a href="../doc/configuration/resolvers.html">configuration section</a>
-
-<h1><a name="configurations">Module configurations explained</a></h1>
-Module configurations are described in the terminology page as <em>a way to use or construct a module</em>. Configurations being a central part of Ivy, they need more explanations as a concept.
-<br/>
-When you define a way to use or construct a module, you are able to define which artifacts are published by this module in this configuration, and you are also able to define which dependencies are needed in this configuration.
-
-Moreover, because dependencies in ivy are expressed on modules and not on artifacts, it is important to be able to define which configurations of the dependency are required in the configuration you define of your module. That's what is called <strong>configuration mapping</strong>.
-
-If you use only simple modules and do not want to worry about configurations, you don't have to worry about them. They're still there under the hood, cause ivy can't work without configuration. But most of the time if you declare nothing, ivy assumes that the artifacts of your module are published in all configurations, and that all the dependencies configurations are required in all configurations. And it works in simple cases. But whenever you want to separate things within a module, or get more control over things published and got through dependencies resolution, configuration may answer most of your needs.
-
-For details on how to declare your module configurations, how declare in which configuration your artifacts are published, and how to declare configuration mapping, please refer to <a href="../doc/ivyfile.html">ivy file documentation</a>. The <a href="../doc/tutorial/conf.html">configurations tutorial</a> is also a good place to go to learn more about this concept.
-
-<h1>Variables</h1>
-During configuration, ivy allows to define what are called ivy variables. Ivy variables can be seen as ant properties, and are used in a very similar way. In particular, you use a properties tag in the configuration file to load a properties file containing ivy variables and their values.
-
-But the main differences between ant properties and ivy variables are that ivy variables can be overriden, whereas ant 
-properties can't, and that they are defined in separate environment.
-
-Actually all ant properties are imported into ivy variables when the configuration is done (if you call ivy from ant). 
-This means that if you define an ant property after the call to configure, it will not be available as an ivy variable.
-On the other hand, ivy variables are NOT exported to ant, thus if you define ivy variables in ivy, do not try to use them as ant properties.
-
-To use ivy variables, you just have to follow that same syntax as for ant properties:
-${<i>variablename</i>}
-where <i>variablename</i> is the name of the variable.
-
-Finally, it's also important to be aware of the time of substitution of variables. This substitution is done as soon as possible. This means that when ivy encounter a reference to a variable, it tries to substitute it if such a variable is defined. Consequently, <strong>any later modification of the variable will not alter the value already substituted</strong>.
-
-Moreover, in an ant environment, a bunch of variables are going to be set by default via the ant property file loading mechanism (in fact they are first loaded as ant properties and then imported as ivy variables, see <a href="../doc/use.html"></a>), and even in the ant properties themselves there is going to be eager substitution on loading, effectively making it impossible to override some variable purely via the ivysettings.properties file. Some variables will really only be able to be overriden via ant properties because of this.
-
-Moreover, it's also important to understand the difference between ivy variables and ivy pattern tokens. 
-See Patterns chapter below to see what pattern tokens are.
-<h1>Patterns</h1>
-
-Ivy patterns are used in many dependency resolvers and ivy tasks, and are a simple way to structure the way ivy works.
-
-First let's give an example. You can for instance configure the file system dependency resolver by giving it
-a pattern to find artifacts. This pattern can be like this:
-myrepository/[organisation]/[module]/[type]s/[artifact]-[revision].[ext]
-
-This pattern indicates that the repository we use is in a directory called myrepository. 
-
-In this directory we have directories having for name the name of the organisation of the module we look for. 
-Then we have a directory per module, each having for name the name of the module.
-Then in module directories we find a directory per artifact type (jars, wars, ivys, ...), in which we find artifacts named by the artifact id, followed by an hyphen, then the revision, a dot, and the artifact extension.
-Not too difficult to understand, isn't it ? That's it, you have understood the pattern concept !
-
-To give a bit more explanation, a pattern is composed of tokens, which are replaced by actual values when evaluated for a particular artifact or module. Those tokens are different from variables because they are replaced differently for each artifact, whereas variables are usually given the same value.
-
-You can mix variables and tokens in a pattern:
-${repository.dir}/[organisation]/[module]/[type]s/[artifact]-[revision].[ext]<br/><br/>
-
-The tokens available depends on where the pattern is used (will it be evaluated with artifacts or modules, for instance).
-But here are all the tokens currently available:
-<ul>
-<li>[organisation]</li> the organisation name
-<li>[module]</li> the module name
-<li>[branch]</li> the branch name
-<li>[revision]</li> the revision name
-<li>[artifact]</li> the artifact name (or id)
-<li>[type]</li> the artifact type
-<li>[ext]</li> the artifact file extension
-<li>[conf]</li> the configuration name
-<li>[originalname] <span class="since">(since 1.4)</span></li> the original artifact name (including the extension)
-</ul>
-
-Difference between type and extension are explained in ivy file documentation.
-
-<span class="since">since 1.2</span> [organization] can be used instead of [organisation].
-
-<span class="since">since 1.3</span> Optinal parts can be used in patterns.
-This let the possibility to avoid some input when a token is not defined, instead of having only the token as blank. Parenthesis are used to delimit the optional part, and only one token can be found inside the parenthesis.
-So if you surround a token with '(' and ')', any other text which is between the parenthesis will be ignored if the token has no value.
-
-For instance, suppose the pattern: "abc(def[type]ghi)"
-type = "jar" -> the substituted pattern: abcdefjarghi
-type = null or "" -> the substitued pattern: abc
-
-A more real life example:
-The pattern <code>[artifact](-[revision]).[ext]</code> let you accept both myartifact-1.0.jar when a revision is set, and myartifact.jar (instead of myartifact-.jar) when no revision is set
-This is particularly useful when you need to keep control on artifact names.
-
-<span class="since">since 1.4</span> Extra attributes can be used as any other token in the patterns.
-
-<h1><a name="latest">Latest Strategy</a></h1>
-Ivy often needs to know which revision between two has to be considered the "latest". For knowing that, it uses the concept of latest strategy. Indeed, there are several way to consider a revision to be the latest.
-You can choose an existing one or plug your own.
-
-But before knowing which revision is the latest, ivy needs to be able to consider several revision of a module. Thus ivy has to get a list of files in a directory, and it uses the dependency resolver for that. So check if the dependency resolver you use is compatible with latest revisions before wondering why ivy do not manage to get your latest revision.
-
-Finally, In order to get several revisions of a module, most of the time you need to use the [revision] token in your pattern, so that ivy gets all the files which match the pattern whatever the revision is. It's only then that the latest strategy is used to determine which of this revisions is the latest one.
-
-Ivy has three built-in latest strategies:
-<ul>
-<li>latest-time</li> it compares the revisions date to know which is the latest. While this is often a good strategy in terms of pertinence, it has the drawback to be costful to compute with distant repositories. If you use ivyrep, for example, ivy has to ask the http server what is the date of each ivy file before knowing which is the latest.
-<li>latest-revision</li> it compares the revisions as string, using an algorithm close to the one used in the php version_compare function.
-This algorithm takes into account special meaning of some text. For instance, with this strategy, 1.0-dev1 is considered before 1.0-alpha1, which in turn is before 1.0-rc1, which is before 1.0, which is before 1.0.1.
-<li>latest-lexico</li>: it compares the revisions as string, using lexicographic order (the one used by java string comparison).
-</ul>
-
-See also how to configure new latest strategies <a href="../doc/configuration/latest-strategies.html">here</a>.
-
-<h1><a name="conflict">Conflict Manager</a></h1>
-A conflict manager is able to select, among a list of module revisions in conflict, a list of revisions to keep.
-Yes, it can selects a list of revision, even if most conflicts manager select only one revision.
-But in some cases you will need to keep several revisions, and load in separate class loaders, for example.
-
-A list of revisions is said to be in conflict if they correspond to the same module, i.e. the same organisation/module name couple.
-
-The list of available conflict managers is available on the <a href="../doc/configuration/conflict-managers.html">conflict manager configuration page</a>.
-
-To have more details on how to setup your conflict managers by module, see <a href="../doc/ivyfile/conflicts.html">conflicts</a> section in ivy file reference.
-
-<h1><a name="matcher">Pattern matcher</a></h1>
-<span class="since">since 1.3</span>
-At several places Ivy let uses pattern to match a set of objects. For instance, you can exclude several modules at once when declaring a dependency by using a pattern matching all the modules to exclude.
-
-Ivy uses pluggable pattern matcher to match those object names. 3 are defined by default:
-<ul>
-<li>exact</li>This matcher matches only string when they are equal to the pattern one
-<li>regexp</li>This matcher let you use regular expression as supported by the Pattern class of java 1.4 or greater
-<li>glob</li>This matcher let you use unix like glob matcher, i.e. where the only meta characters are * which matches any sequence of characters and ? which matches exactly one character. Note that this matcher is available only with jakarta oro 2.0.8 in your classpath.
-</ul>
-Note also that with any matcher the character '*' has the special meaning of matching anything. This is particularly useful with default values which do not depend on the matcher.
-
-<h1><a name="extra">Extra attributes</a></h1>
-<span class="since">since 1.4</span>
-Several tags in ivy xml files are extensible with what is called extra attributes. 
-The idea is very simple: if you need some more information to define your modules, you can add the attribute you want and you will then be able to access it as any other attribute in your patterns for example.
-
-Example:
-Here is an ivy file with the attribute 'color' set to blue:
-<code type="xml">
-<ivy-module version="1.4">
-	<info organisation="apache"
-	       module="foo"
-	       color="blue"
-	       status="integration"
-	       revision="1.59"
-	/>
-</ivy-module>
-</code>
-Then you can use the extra attribute when you declare a dependency on foo:
-<code>
-<dependency org="apache" name="foo" color="blue" rev="1.5+" />
-</code>
-And you can define your repository pattern as:
-<code>
-${repository.dir}/[organisation]/[module]/[color]/[revision]/[artifact].[ext]
-</code>
-
-Note that in order to use extra attributes, you will need to disable ivy file validation, since your files won't fulffill anymore the official ivy xsd. See the <a href="../doc/configuration/conf.html">configuration doc page</a> to see how to disable validation.
-<h1><a name="checksum">Checksums</a></h1>
-<span class="since">since 1.4</span>
-Ivy allow to use checksums, also known as digester, to verify the correctness of a downloaded file.
-
-For the moment Ivy supports md5 and sha1 algorithm.
-
-The configuration of using md5 and/or sha1 can be done globally or by dependency resolver.
-Globally, use the ivy.checksums variable to list the check to be done (only md5 and sha1 are supported).
-On each resolver you can use the checksums attribute to override the global setting.
-
-The setting is a comma separated list of checksum algorithm to use.
-During checking (at download time), the first checksum found is checked, and that's all. This means that if you have a "sha1, md5" setting, then if ivy finds a sha1 file, it will compare the downloaded file sha1 against this sha1, and if the comparison is ok, it will assume the file is ok. If no sha1 file is found, it will look for a md5 file. If none is found no checking is done.
-During publish, all listed checksum algorithms are computed and uploaded.
-
-By default checksum algorithms are "sha1, md5".
-
-If you want to change this default, you can set the variable ivy.checksums. Hence to disable checksum validation you just have to set ivy.checksums to "".
-
-<h1><a name="event">Events and Triggers</a></h1>
-<span class="since">since 1.4</span>
-When Ivy performs the dependency resolution and some other tasks, it fires events before and after the most important steps. You can listen to these events using Ivy API, or you can even register a trigger to perform a particular action when a particular event occur.
-
-This is a particularly powerful and flexible feature which allow for example to perform a build of a dependency just before it is resolved, or follow what's happening during the dependency resolution process accuratly, and so on.
-
-For more details about event and triggers, see the <a href="../doc/configuration/triggers.html">triggers</a> documentation page in the configuration section of this documentation.
-
-<h1><a name="circular">Circular Dependencies</a></h1>
-<span class="since">since 1.4</span>
-Circular dependencies can be either direct or indirect. For instance, if A depends on A it's a circular dependency, and if A depends on B which itself depends on A, this is also a circular dependency.
-
-Prior to Ivy 1.4 circular dependencies where causing a failure in Ivy. As of Ivy 1.4, the behaviour of Ivy when it finds a circular dependency is configurable through a circular dependency strategy.
-
-3 built-in strategies are available:
-<ul>
-<li>ignore</li> circular dependencies are only signaled in verbose messages
-<li>warn</li> same as ignore, except that they are signaled as warning (default)
-<li>error</li> halt the dependency resolution when a circular dependency is found. 
-</ul>
-
-See the <a href="../doc/configuration/conf.html">configuration page</a> to see how to configure the circular dependency strategy you want to use.
-	</textarea>
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-</body>
-</html>
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+   "License"); you may not use this file except in compliance
+   with the License.  You may obtain a copy of the License at
+
+     http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0
+
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+   software distributed under the License is distributed on an
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+<head>
+	<META HTTP-EQUIV="Content-Type" CONTENT="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1">
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+<h1>Dependency Resolver</h1>
+A dependency resolver is a pluggable class in ivy which is used to:
+<ul>
+<li>find dependencies ivy files</li>
+<li>download dependencies artifacts</li>
+</ul>
+The notion of artifact "downloading" is large: artifact can be on a web site, or on the local file system of your machine. The download is thus the fact to bring a file from a repository to ivy cache.
+
+Moreover, the fact that it is the responsibility of the resolver to find ivy files and download artifacts help to implement various resolving strategies.
+
+As you see, a dependency resolver can be thought as a class responsible of describing a repository.
+
+If you want to see which resolvers are available in ivy, you can go to the corresponding <a href="../doc/configuration/resolvers.html">configuration section</a>
+
+<h1><a name="configurations">Module configurations explained</a></h1>
+Module configurations are described in the terminology page as <em>a way to use or construct a module</em>. Configurations being a central part of Ivy, they need more explanations as a concept.
+<br/>
+When you define a way to use or construct a module, you are able to define which artifacts are published by this module in this configuration, and you are also able to define which dependencies are needed in this configuration.
+
+Moreover, because dependencies in ivy are expressed on modules and not on artifacts, it is important to be able to define which configurations of the dependency are required in the configuration you define of your module. That's what is called <strong>configuration mapping</strong>.
+
+If you use only simple modules and do not want to worry about configurations, you don't have to worry about them. They're still there under the hood, cause ivy can't work without configuration. But most of the time if you declare nothing, ivy assumes that the artifacts of your module are published in all configurations, and that all the dependencies configurations are required in all configurations. And it works in simple cases. But whenever you want to separate things within a module, or get more control over things published and got through dependencies resolution, configuration may answer most of your needs.
+
+For details on how to declare your module configurations, how declare in which configuration your artifacts are published, and how to declare configuration mapping, please refer to <a href="../doc/ivyfile.html">ivy file documentation</a>. The <a href="../doc/tutorial/conf.html">configurations tutorial</a> is also a good place to go to learn more about this concept.
+
+<h1>Variables</h1>
+During configuration, ivy allows to define what are called ivy variables. Ivy variables can be seen as ant properties, and are used in a very similar way. In particular, you use a properties tag in the configuration file to load a properties file containing ivy variables and their values.
+
+But the main differences between ant properties and ivy variables are that ivy variables can be overriden, whereas ant 
+properties can't, and that they are defined in separate environment.
+
+Actually all ant properties are imported into ivy variables when the configuration is done (if you call ivy from ant). 
+This means that if you define an ant property after the call to configure, it will not be available as an ivy variable.
+On the other hand, ivy variables are NOT exported to ant, thus if you define ivy variables in ivy, do not try to use them as ant properties.
+
+To use ivy variables, you just have to follow that same syntax as for ant properties:
+${<i>variablename</i>}
+where <i>variablename</i> is the name of the variable.
+
+Finally, it's also important to be aware of the time of substitution of variables. This substitution is done as soon as possible. This means that when ivy encounter a reference to a variable, it tries to substitute it if such a variable is defined. Consequently, <strong>any later modification of the variable will not alter the value already substituted</strong>.
+
+Moreover, in an ant environment, a bunch of variables are going to be set by default via the ant property file loading mechanism (in fact they are first loaded as ant properties and then imported as ivy variables, see <a href="../doc/use.html"></a>), and even in the ant properties themselves there is going to be eager substitution on loading, effectively making it impossible to override some variable purely via the ivysettings.properties file. Some variables will really only be able to be overriden via ant properties because of this.
+
+Moreover, it's also important to understand the difference between ivy variables and ivy pattern tokens. 
+See Patterns chapter below to see what pattern tokens are.
+<h1>Patterns</h1>
+
+Ivy patterns are used in many dependency resolvers and ivy tasks, and are a simple way to structure the way ivy works.
+
+First let's give an example. You can for instance configure the file system dependency resolver by giving it
+a pattern to find artifacts. This pattern can be like this:
+myrepository/[organisation]/[module]/[type]s/[artifact]-[revision].[ext]
+
+This pattern indicates that the repository we use is in a directory called myrepository. 
+
+In this directory we have directories having for name the name of the organisation of the module we look for. 
+Then we have a directory per module, each having for name the name of the module.
+Then in module directories we find a directory per artifact type (jars, wars, ivys, ...), in which we find artifacts named by the artifact id, followed by an hyphen, then the revision, a dot, and the artifact extension.
+Not too difficult to understand, isn't it ? That's it, you have understood the pattern concept !
+
+To give a bit more explanation, a pattern is composed of tokens, which are replaced by actual values when evaluated for a particular artifact or module. Those tokens are different from variables because they are replaced differently for each artifact, whereas variables are usually given the same value.
+
+You can mix variables and tokens in a pattern:
+${repository.dir}/[organisation]/[module]/[type]s/[artifact]-[revision].[ext]<br/><br/>
+
+The tokens available depends on where the pattern is used (will it be evaluated with artifacts or modules, for instance).
+But here are all the tokens currently available:
+<ul>
+<li>[organisation]</li> the organisation name
+<li>[module]</li> the module name
+<li>[branch]</li> the branch name
+<li>[revision]</li> the revision name
+<li>[artifact]</li> the artifact name (or id)
+<li>[type]</li> the artifact type
+<li>[ext]</li> the artifact file extension
+<li>[conf]</li> the configuration name
+<li>[originalname] <span class="since">(since 1.4)</span></li> the original artifact name (including the extension)
+</ul>
+
+Difference between type and extension are explained in ivy file documentation.
+
+<span class="since">since 1.2</span> [organization] can be used instead of [organisation].
+
+<span class="since">since 1.3</span> Optinal parts can be used in patterns.
+This let the possibility to avoid some input when a token is not defined, instead of having only the token as blank. Parenthesis are used to delimit the optional part, and only one token can be found inside the parenthesis.
+So if you surround a token with '(' and ')', any other text which is between the parenthesis will be ignored if the token has no value.
+
+For instance, suppose the pattern: "abc(def[type]ghi)"
+type = "jar" -> the substituted pattern: abcdefjarghi
+type = null or "" -> the substitued pattern: abc
+
+A more real life example:
+The pattern <code>[artifact](-[revision]).[ext]</code> let you accept both myartifact-1.0.jar when a revision is set, and myartifact.jar (instead of myartifact-.jar) when no revision is set
+This is particularly useful when you need to keep control on artifact names.
+
+<span class="since">since 1.4</span> Extra attributes can be used as any other token in the patterns.
+
+<h1><a name="latest">Latest Strategy</a></h1>
+Ivy often needs to know which revision between two has to be considered the "latest". For knowing that, it uses the concept of latest strategy. Indeed, there are several way to consider a revision to be the latest.
+You can choose an existing one or plug your own.
+
+But before knowing which revision is the latest, ivy needs to be able to consider several revision of a module. Thus ivy has to get a list of files in a directory, and it uses the dependency resolver for that. So check if the dependency resolver you use is compatible with latest revisions before wondering why ivy do not manage to get your latest revision.
+
+Finally, In order to get several revisions of a module, most of the time you need to use the [revision] token in your pattern, so that ivy gets all the files which match the pattern whatever the revision is. It's only then that the latest strategy is used to determine which of this revisions is the latest one.
+
+Ivy has three built-in latest strategies:
+<ul>
+<li>latest-time</li> it compares the revisions date to know which is the latest. While this is often a good strategy in terms of pertinence, it has the drawback to be costful to compute with distant repositories. If you use ivyrep, for example, ivy has to ask the http server what is the date of each ivy file before knowing which is the latest.
+<li>latest-revision</li> it compares the revisions as string, using an algorithm close to the one used in the php version_compare function.
+This algorithm takes into account special meaning of some text. For instance, with this strategy, 1.0-dev1 is considered before 1.0-alpha1, which in turn is before 1.0-rc1, which is before 1.0, which is before 1.0.1.
+<li>latest-lexico</li>: it compares the revisions as string, using lexicographic order (the one used by java string comparison).
+</ul>
+
+See also how to configure new latest strategies <a href="../doc/configuration/latest-strategies.html">here</a>.
+
+<h1><a name="conflict">Conflict Manager</a></h1>
+A conflict manager is able to select, among a list of module revisions in conflict, a list of revisions to keep.
+Yes, it can selects a list of revision, even if most conflicts manager select only one revision.
+But in some cases you will need to keep several revisions, and load in separate class loaders, for example.
+
+A list of revisions is said to be in conflict if they correspond to the same module, i.e. the same organisation/module name couple.
+
+The list of available conflict managers is available on the <a href="../doc/configuration/conflict-managers.html">conflict manager configuration page</a>.
+
+To have more details on how to setup your conflict managers by module, see <a href="../doc/ivyfile/conflicts.html">conflicts</a> section in ivy file reference.
+
+<h1><a name="matcher">Pattern matcher</a></h1>
+<span class="since">since 1.3</span>
+At several places Ivy let uses pattern to match a set of objects. For instance, you can exclude several modules at once when declaring a dependency by using a pattern matching all the modules to exclude.
+
+Ivy uses pluggable pattern matcher to match those object names. 3 are defined by default:
+<ul>
+<li>exact</li>This matcher matches only string when they are equal to the pattern one
+<li>regexp</li>This matcher let you use regular expression as supported by the Pattern class of java 1.4 or greater
+<li>glob</li>This matcher let you use unix like glob matcher, i.e. where the only meta characters are * which matches any sequence of characters and ? which matches exactly one character. Note that this matcher is available only with jakarta oro 2.0.8 in your classpath.
+</ul>
+Note also that with any matcher the character '*' has the special meaning of matching anything. This is particularly useful with default values which do not depend on the matcher.
+
+<h1><a name="extra">Extra attributes</a></h1>
+<span class="since">since 1.4</span>
+Several tags in ivy xml files are extensible with what is called extra attributes. 
+The idea is very simple: if you need some more information to define your modules, you can add the attribute you want and you will then be able to access it as any other attribute in your patterns for example.
+
+Example:
+Here is an ivy file with the attribute 'color' set to blue:
+<code type="xml">
+<ivy-module version="1.4">
+	<info organisation="apache"
+	       module="foo"
+	       color="blue"
+	       status="integration"
+	       revision="1.59"
+	/>
+</ivy-module>
+</code>
+Then you can use the extra attribute when you declare a dependency on foo:
+<code>
+<dependency org="apache" name="foo" color="blue" rev="1.5+" />
+</code>
+And you can define your repository pattern as:
+<code>
+${repository.dir}/[organisation]/[module]/[color]/[revision]/[artifact].[ext]
+</code>
+
+Note that in order to use extra attributes, you will need to disable ivy file validation, since your files won't fulffill anymore the official ivy xsd. See the <a href="../doc/configuration/conf.html">configuration doc page</a> to see how to disable validation.
+<h1><a name="checksum">Checksums</a></h1>
+<span class="since">since 1.4</span>
+Ivy allow to use checksums, also known as digester, to verify the correctness of a downloaded file.
+
+For the moment Ivy supports md5 and sha1 algorithm.
+
+The configuration of using md5 and/or sha1 can be done globally or by dependency resolver.
+Globally, use the ivy.checksums variable to list the check to be done (only md5 and sha1 are supported).
+On each resolver you can use the checksums attribute to override the global setting.
+
+The setting is a comma separated list of checksum algorithm to use.
+During checking (at download time), the first checksum found is checked, and that's all. This means that if you have a "sha1, md5" setting, then if ivy finds a sha1 file, it will compare the downloaded file sha1 against this sha1, and if the comparison is ok, it will assume the file is ok. If no sha1 file is found, it will look for a md5 file. If none is found no checking is done.
+During publish, all listed checksum algorithms are computed and uploaded.
+
+By default checksum algorithms are "sha1, md5".
+
+If you want to change this default, you can set the variable ivy.checksums. Hence to disable checksum validation you just have to set ivy.checksums to "".
+
+<h1><a name="event">Events and Triggers</a></h1>
+<span class="since">since 1.4</span>
+When Ivy performs the dependency resolution and some other tasks, it fires events before and after the most important steps. You can listen to these events using Ivy API, or you can even register a trigger to perform a particular action when a particular event occur.
+
+This is a particularly powerful and flexible feature which allow for example to perform a build of a dependency just before it is resolved, or follow what's happening during the dependency resolution process accuratly, and so on.
+
+For more details about event and triggers, see the <a href="../doc/configuration/triggers.html">triggers</a> documentation page in the configuration section of this documentation.
+
+<h1><a name="circular">Circular Dependencies</a></h1>
+<span class="since">since 1.4</span>
+Circular dependencies can be either direct or indirect. For instance, if A depends on A it's a circular dependency, and if A depends on B which itself depends on A, this is also a circular dependency.
+
+Prior to Ivy 1.4 circular dependencies where causing a failure in Ivy. As of Ivy 1.4, the behaviour of Ivy when it finds a circular dependency is configurable through a circular dependency strategy.
+
+3 built-in strategies are available:
+<ul>
+<li>ignore</li> circular dependencies are only signaled in verbose messages
+<li>warn</li> same as ignore, except that they are signaled as warning (default)
+<li>error</li> halt the dependency resolution when a circular dependency is found. 
+</ul>
+
+See the <a href="../doc/configuration/conf.html">configuration page</a> to see how to configure the circular dependency strategy you want to use.
+	</textarea>
+<script type="text/javascript">xooki.postProcess();</script>
+</body>
+</html>

Propchange: incubator/ivy/core/trunk/doc/doc/concept.html
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    svn:eol-style = LF

Modified: incubator/ivy/core/trunk/doc/doc/configuration.html
URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewvc/incubator/ivy/core/trunk/doc/doc/configuration.html?view=diff&rev=536488&r1=536487&r2=536488
==============================================================================
--- incubator/ivy/core/trunk/doc/doc/configuration.html (original)
+++ incubator/ivy/core/trunk/doc/doc/configuration.html Wed May  9 03:58:10 2007
@@ -1,152 +1,152 @@
-<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">
-<!--
-   Licensed to the Apache Software Foundation (ASF) under one
-   or more contributor license agreements.  See the NOTICE file
-   distributed with this work for additional information
-   regarding copyright ownership.  The ASF licenses this file
-   to you under the Apache License, Version 2.0 (the
-   "License"); you may not use this file except in compliance
-   with the License.  You may obtain a copy of the License at
-
-     http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0
-
-   Unless required by applicable law or agreed to in writing,
-   software distributed under the License is distributed on an
-   "AS IS" BASIS, WITHOUT WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY
-   KIND, either express or implied.  See the License for the
-   specific language governing permissions and limitations
-   under the License.    
--->
-<html>
-<head>
-	<META HTTP-EQUIV="Content-Type" CONTENT="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1">
-	<script type="text/javascript">var xookiConfig = {level: 1};</script>	
-	<script type="text/javascript" src="../xooki/xooki.js"></script>
-</head>
-<body>
-	<textarea id="xooki-source">
-In order to work as you want, ivy sometimes need some settings. Actually, ivy can work with no specific settings at all, see the <a href="../doc/tutorial/defaultconf.html">default settings documentation</a> for details about that. But ivy is able 
-to work in very different contexts. You just have to configure it properly.
-
-Settings are specified through an xml file, usually called ivysettings.xml. To configure ivy from ant, you just have to call the configure task and pass it the path to your settings file (see <a href="../doc/use/configure.html">configure</a> task documentation for details).
-
-Here is an example of settings file :
-<code type="xml">
-<ivysettings>
-        <properties file="${ivy.settings.dir}/ivysettings-file.properties" />
-        <settings defaultCache="${cache.dir}" defaultResolver="ibiblio" checkUpToDate="false" />
-        <resolvers>
-                <ibiblio name="ibiblio" />
-                <filesystem name="internal">
-                        <ivy pattern="${repository.dir}/[module]/ivy-[revision].xml" />
-                        <artifact pattern="${repository.dir}/[module]/[artifact]-[revision].[ext]" />
-                </filesystem>
-        </resolvers>
-        <modules>
-                <module organisation="jayasoft" name=".*" resolver="internal" />
-        </modules>
-</ivysettings>
-</code>
-
-<br/>
-Mainly, the settings enable to configure the default cache directory used by ivy and the dependency resolvers that it will use to resolve dependencies.
-<i>Note: To work, this settings file needs a property file named ivysettings-file.properties in the same directory as the settings file, with ivy variables you want in it.</i>
-
-Some useful variables are available in settings files:
-<ul>
-<li>ivy.settings.dir</li> this variable references the directory in which the ivysettings itself is. This is available if the settings has been loaded as a file. In case of an url, it takes the part before the last slash of the url, if any. If the url has no slash, then this variable is not set.
-<li>ivy.settings.file</li>the path of the settings file itself, it has been loaded as a file only. If it has been loaded as an url, this variable is not set
-<li>ivy.settings.url</li>the url pointing to the settings file. This is set both when it has been loaded as a file or an url
-</ul>
-
-<span class="since">since 1.4</span> Note that all <a href="http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.4.2/docs/api/java/lang/System.html#getProperties()">java system properties</a> are available as ivy variables in your settings file.
-
-<h1>Settings file structure</h1>
-
-The settings file is structured in some parts and left other open. Indeed each resolver has its own structure, thus it's not the settings file itself which define the structure for the resolvers.
-
-<pre>
-ivysettings
-    <a href="../doc/configuration/property.html">property</a>
-    <a href="../doc/configuration/properties.html">properties</a>
-    <a href="../doc/configuration/conf.html">settings</a>
-    <a href="../doc/configuration/include.html">include</a>
-    <a href="../doc/configuration/classpath.html">classpath</a>
-    <a href="../doc/configuration/typedef.html">typedef</a>
-    <a href="../doc/configuration/latest-strategies.html">latest-strategies</a>
-    <a href="../doc/configuration/version-matchers.html">version-matchers</a>
-    <a href="../doc/configuration/triggers.html">triggers</a>
-    <a href="../doc/configuration/parsers.html">parsers</a>
-    <a href="../doc/configuration/conflict-managers.html">conflict-managers</a>
-    <a href="../doc/configuration/outputters.html">outputters</a>
-    <a href="../doc/configuration/namespaces.html">namespaces</a>
-        <a href="../doc/configuration/namespace.html">namespace</a>
-            <a href="../doc/configuration/namespace/rule.html">rule</a>
-                <a href="../doc/configuration/namespace/fromtosystem.html">fromsystem</a>
-                    <a href="../doc/configuration/namespace/src.html">src</a>
-                    <a href="../doc/configuration/namespace/dest.html">dest</a>
-                <a href="../doc/configuration/namespace/fromtosystem.html">tosystem</a>
-                    <a href="../doc/configuration/namespace/src.html">src</a>
-                    <a href="../doc/configuration/namespace/dest.html">dest</a>
-    <a href="../doc/configuration/macrodef.html">macrodef</a>
-        <a href="../doc/configuration/macrodef/attribute.html">attribute</a>
-        any resolver
-    <a href="../doc/configuration/resolvers.html">resolvers</a>
-        any resolver
-    <a href="../doc/configuration/modules.html">modules</a>
-        <a href="../doc/configuration/module.html">module</a>
-    <a href="../doc/configuration/statuses.html">statuses</a>
-        <a href="../doc/configuration/status.html">status</a>
-</pre>
-
-<h1>ivysettings</h1>
-<b>Tag:</b> ivysettings
-
-Root tag of any ivysettings file.
-<h2>Child elements</h2>
-<table class="ivy-children">
-<thead>
-    <tr><th class="ivy-chld">Element</th><th class="ivy-chld-desc">Description</th><th class="ivy-chld-card">Cardinality</th></tr>
-</thead>
-<tbody>
-    <tr><td><a href="../doc/configuration/property.html">property</a></td><td>set an ivy variable</td>
-        <td>0..n</td></tr>
-    <tr><td><a href="../doc/configuration/properties.html">properties</a></td><td>loads a properties file as ivy variables</td>
-        <td>0..n</td></tr>
-    <tr><td><a href="../doc/configuration/conf.html">settings</a></td><td>configures ivy with some defaults</td>
-        <td>0..1</td></tr>
-    <tr><td><a href="../doc/configuration/include.html">include</a></td><td>includes another settings file</td>
-        <td>0..n</td></tr>
-    <tr><td><a href="../doc/configuration/classpath.html">classpath</a></td><td>add a location in the classpath used to load plugins</td>
-        <td>0..n</td></tr>
-    <tr><td><a href="../doc/configuration/typedef.html">typedef</a></td><td>defines new types in ivy</td>
-        <td>0..n</td></tr>
-    <tr><td><a href="../doc/configuration/latest-strategies.html">latest-strategies</a></td><td>defines latest strategies</td>
-        <td>0..1</td></tr>
-    <tr><td><a href="../doc/configuration/parsers.html">parsers</a></td><td>defines module descriptor parsers</td>
-        <td>0..1</td></tr>
-    <tr><td><a href="../doc/configuration/version-matchers.html">version-matchers</a></td><td>defines new version matchers</td>
-        <td>0..1</td></tr>
-    <tr><td><a href="../doc/configuration/triggers.html">triggers</a></td><td>register triggers on ivy events</td>
-        <td>0..1</td></tr>
-    <tr><td><a href="../doc/configuration/namespaces.html">namespaces</a></td><td>defines new namespaces</td>
-        <td>0..1</td></tr>
-    <tr><td><a href="../doc/configuration/macrodef.html">macrodef</a></td><td>defines a new macro resolver</td>
-        <td>0..n</td></tr>
-    <tr><td><a href="../doc/configuration/resolvers.html">resolvers</a></td><td>defines dependency resolvers</td>
-        <td>0..1</td></tr>
-    <tr><td><a href="../doc/configuration/conflict-managers.html">conflict-managers</a></td><td>defines conflicts managers</td>
-        <td>0..1</td></tr>
-    <tr><td><a href="../doc/configuration/modules.html">modules</a></td><td>defines rules between modules and dependency resolvers</td>
-        <td>0..1</td></tr>
-    <tr><td><a href="../doc/configuration/outputters.html">outputters</a></td><td>defines the list of available report outputters</td>
-        <td>0..1</td></tr>
-    <tr><td><a href="../doc/configuration/statuses.html">statuses</a></td><td>defines the list of available statuses</td>
-        <td>0..1</td></tr>
-</tbody>
-</table>
-
-	</textarea>
-<script type="text/javascript">xooki.postProcess();</script>
-</body>
-</html>
+<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">
+<!--
+   Licensed to the Apache Software Foundation (ASF) under one
+   or more contributor license agreements.  See the NOTICE file
+   distributed with this work for additional information
+   regarding copyright ownership.  The ASF licenses this file
+   to you under the Apache License, Version 2.0 (the
+   "License"); you may not use this file except in compliance
+   with the License.  You may obtain a copy of the License at
+
+     http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0
+
+   Unless required by applicable law or agreed to in writing,
+   software distributed under the License is distributed on an
+   "AS IS" BASIS, WITHOUT WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY
+   KIND, either express or implied.  See the License for the
+   specific language governing permissions and limitations
+   under the License.    
+-->
+<html>
+<head>
+	<META HTTP-EQUIV="Content-Type" CONTENT="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1">
+	<script type="text/javascript">var xookiConfig = {level: 1};</script>	
+	<script type="text/javascript" src="../xooki/xooki.js"></script>
+</head>
+<body>
+	<textarea id="xooki-source">
+In order to work as you want, ivy sometimes need some settings. Actually, ivy can work with no specific settings at all, see the <a href="../doc/tutorial/defaultconf.html">default settings documentation</a> for details about that. But ivy is able 
+to work in very different contexts. You just have to configure it properly.
+
+Settings are specified through an xml file, usually called ivysettings.xml. To configure ivy from ant, you just have to call the configure task and pass it the path to your settings file (see <a href="../doc/use/configure.html">configure</a> task documentation for details).
+
+Here is an example of settings file :
+<code type="xml">
+<ivysettings>
+        <properties file="${ivy.settings.dir}/ivysettings-file.properties" />
+        <settings defaultCache="${cache.dir}" defaultResolver="ibiblio" checkUpToDate="false" />
+        <resolvers>
+                <ibiblio name="ibiblio" />
+                <filesystem name="internal">
+                        <ivy pattern="${repository.dir}/[module]/ivy-[revision].xml" />
+                        <artifact pattern="${repository.dir}/[module]/[artifact]-[revision].[ext]" />
+                </filesystem>
+        </resolvers>
+        <modules>
+                <module organisation="jayasoft" name=".*" resolver="internal" />
+        </modules>
+</ivysettings>
+</code>
+
+<br/>
+Mainly, the settings enable to configure the default cache directory used by ivy and the dependency resolvers that it will use to resolve dependencies.
+<i>Note: To work, this settings file needs a property file named ivysettings-file.properties in the same directory as the settings file, with ivy variables you want in it.</i>
+
+Some useful variables are available in settings files:
+<ul>
+<li>ivy.settings.dir</li> this variable references the directory in which the ivysettings itself is. This is available if the settings has been loaded as a file. In case of an url, it takes the part before the last slash of the url, if any. If the url has no slash, then this variable is not set.
+<li>ivy.settings.file</li>the path of the settings file itself, it has been loaded as a file only. If it has been loaded as an url, this variable is not set
+<li>ivy.settings.url</li>the url pointing to the settings file. This is set both when it has been loaded as a file or an url
+</ul>
+
+<span class="since">since 1.4</span> Note that all <a href="http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.4.2/docs/api/java/lang/System.html#getProperties()">java system properties</a> are available as ivy variables in your settings file.
+
+<h1>Settings file structure</h1>
+
+The settings file is structured in some parts and left other open. Indeed each resolver has its own structure, thus it's not the settings file itself which define the structure for the resolvers.
+
+<pre>
+ivysettings
+    <a href="../doc/configuration/property.html">property</a>
+    <a href="../doc/configuration/properties.html">properties</a>
+    <a href="../doc/configuration/conf.html">settings</a>
+    <a href="../doc/configuration/include.html">include</a>
+    <a href="../doc/configuration/classpath.html">classpath</a>
+    <a href="../doc/configuration/typedef.html">typedef</a>
+    <a href="../doc/configuration/latest-strategies.html">latest-strategies</a>
+    <a href="../doc/configuration/version-matchers.html">version-matchers</a>
+    <a href="../doc/configuration/triggers.html">triggers</a>
+    <a href="../doc/configuration/parsers.html">parsers</a>
+    <a href="../doc/configuration/conflict-managers.html">conflict-managers</a>
+    <a href="../doc/configuration/outputters.html">outputters</a>
+    <a href="../doc/configuration/namespaces.html">namespaces</a>
+        <a href="../doc/configuration/namespace.html">namespace</a>
+            <a href="../doc/configuration/namespace/rule.html">rule</a>
+                <a href="../doc/configuration/namespace/fromtosystem.html">fromsystem</a>
+                    <a href="../doc/configuration/namespace/src.html">src</a>
+                    <a href="../doc/configuration/namespace/dest.html">dest</a>
+                <a href="../doc/configuration/namespace/fromtosystem.html">tosystem</a>
+                    <a href="../doc/configuration/namespace/src.html">src</a>
+                    <a href="../doc/configuration/namespace/dest.html">dest</a>
+    <a href="../doc/configuration/macrodef.html">macrodef</a>
+        <a href="../doc/configuration/macrodef/attribute.html">attribute</a>
+        any resolver
+    <a href="../doc/configuration/resolvers.html">resolvers</a>
+        any resolver
+    <a href="../doc/configuration/modules.html">modules</a>
+        <a href="../doc/configuration/module.html">module</a>
+    <a href="../doc/configuration/statuses.html">statuses</a>
+        <a href="../doc/configuration/status.html">status</a>
+</pre>
+
+<h1>ivysettings</h1>
+<b>Tag:</b> ivysettings
+
+Root tag of any ivysettings file.
+<h2>Child elements</h2>
+<table class="ivy-children">
+<thead>
+    <tr><th class="ivy-chld">Element</th><th class="ivy-chld-desc">Description</th><th class="ivy-chld-card">Cardinality</th></tr>
+</thead>
+<tbody>
+    <tr><td><a href="../doc/configuration/property.html">property</a></td><td>set an ivy variable</td>
+        <td>0..n</td></tr>
+    <tr><td><a href="../doc/configuration/properties.html">properties</a></td><td>loads a properties file as ivy variables</td>
+        <td>0..n</td></tr>
+    <tr><td><a href="../doc/configuration/conf.html">settings</a></td><td>configures ivy with some defaults</td>
+        <td>0..1</td></tr>
+    <tr><td><a href="../doc/configuration/include.html">include</a></td><td>includes another settings file</td>
+        <td>0..n</td></tr>
+    <tr><td><a href="../doc/configuration/classpath.html">classpath</a></td><td>add a location in the classpath used to load plugins</td>
+        <td>0..n</td></tr>
+    <tr><td><a href="../doc/configuration/typedef.html">typedef</a></td><td>defines new types in ivy</td>
+        <td>0..n</td></tr>
+    <tr><td><a href="../doc/configuration/latest-strategies.html">latest-strategies</a></td><td>defines latest strategies</td>
+        <td>0..1</td></tr>
+    <tr><td><a href="../doc/configuration/parsers.html">parsers</a></td><td>defines module descriptor parsers</td>
+        <td>0..1</td></tr>
+    <tr><td><a href="../doc/configuration/version-matchers.html">version-matchers</a></td><td>defines new version matchers</td>
+        <td>0..1</td></tr>
+    <tr><td><a href="../doc/configuration/triggers.html">triggers</a></td><td>register triggers on ivy events</td>
+        <td>0..1</td></tr>
+    <tr><td><a href="../doc/configuration/namespaces.html">namespaces</a></td><td>defines new namespaces</td>
+        <td>0..1</td></tr>
+    <tr><td><a href="../doc/configuration/macrodef.html">macrodef</a></td><td>defines a new macro resolver</td>
+        <td>0..n</td></tr>
+    <tr><td><a href="../doc/configuration/resolvers.html">resolvers</a></td><td>defines dependency resolvers</td>
+        <td>0..1</td></tr>
+    <tr><td><a href="../doc/configuration/conflict-managers.html">conflict-managers</a></td><td>defines conflicts managers</td>
+        <td>0..1</td></tr>
+    <tr><td><a href="../doc/configuration/modules.html">modules</a></td><td>defines rules between modules and dependency resolvers</td>
+        <td>0..1</td></tr>
+    <tr><td><a href="../doc/configuration/outputters.html">outputters</a></td><td>defines the list of available report outputters</td>
+        <td>0..1</td></tr>
+    <tr><td><a href="../doc/configuration/statuses.html">statuses</a></td><td>defines the list of available statuses</td>
+        <td>0..1</td></tr>
+</tbody>
+</table>
+
+	</textarea>
+<script type="text/javascript">xooki.postProcess();</script>
+</body>
+</html>

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------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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